Other Oral Problems

Veterinary Dentistry and Oral care is a diverse area. It is not just about dirty teeth, or smelly breath. As Veterinary Dentists we treat a wide range of oral issues from gingival hyperplasia to oral neoplasia. The field of Veterinary Dentistry is not just about teeth!

The other tissues in the mouth can develop problems. A common area to develop issues is the gingiva (or gums). This is predominantly as a result of Periodontal Disease, but there are other medical problems and even physical problems that can affect the health of the gingiva.

Some issues that we work with in the mouth have go to do with the underlying bones of th mouth – the Maxillary bone (top jaw) or and the Mandible (bottom jaw). These bones are intimately involved with Dentistry as they are the areas into which the teeth are attached. Unfortunately due to a number of diseases they too can become diseased, leading to issues causing real concern for our pets.

In this section you will find further information about these issues and learn how we approach them.

Further Information

For further information about topics associated with Other Oral Problems please follow the links provided.

These teeth have been height reduced on this Baboon.
Tooth Resorption (Canine)

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Tooth Resorption (Feline)

Tooth resorption has been known by many names. These lesions have previously been referred to as feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions (FORLs), neck lesions, cervical lesions, cervical line lesions, feline caries, dental resorptive lesions, external odontoclastic resorptions, cervical root resorptions, feline odontolysis and most likely many more. 

Gingival Hyperplasia

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Oral Masses

Regular oral examinations often reveal the presence of swellings or masses in our furry companions‚Äô mouths. Sometimes, pet owners bring their animals to us specifically due to the detection of an oral mass either at home or by another veterinarian. Identifying these masses is not always straightforward ‚Äď some are benign, requiring minimal intervention, while others demand a more intricate diagnosis and treatment.

Mandibulectomies and Maxillectomies

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Jaw Fractures

Jaw fractures in pets, resulting from trauma, require specialised care. Veterinary dentistry provides a considered approach to these cases, sparing function and anatomy.

Due to the high vascularity of the oral cavity, most oral fractures will repair no matter which technique is used, providing fixation is reasonable.  Repair and adequate healing of the fracture unfortunately does not guarantee return to function.  Returning the animal to a normal functional occlusion as soon as possible post-operatively should be the objective of any treatment performed.

Dentigerous Cysts

Dentigerous cysts are fluid filled, expansile, cystic lesions that can form around unerupted teeth. In our experience dentigerous cysts can affect any breed of dog however brachycephalic or short nosed breeds (Pugs, Frenchies, Boxer dogs) and micro breeds such as chihuahuas are most often affected.

Oronasal Fistula

An oronasal fistula (ONF) is a pathological connection between the oral and nasal cavities, primarily observed in dogs, with rare occurrences in cats. This condition typically arises in dogs suffering from advanced periodontal disease in the upper jaw.

Complex Anaesthesia

In Veterinary Dentistry, general anaesthesia is a crucial element of ensuring safe and thorough dental procedures for our patients. While general anaesthesia has become significantly safer over the years, there are instances where certain patients present higher risks due to underlying health conditions. For these complex cases, the involvement of specialized Anaesthetists becomes imperative to enhance safety and tailor anaesthetic protocols to individual needs.

Overclosure

Malocclusions or bite abnormalities are not observed as commonly in cats as they are in dogs. 

One of the most common traumatic malocclusions occurs when the maxillary fourth premolar tooth contacts and traumatises the soft tissue adjacent to the mandibular molar tooth. 

Lip Entrapment

Lip entrapment is a condition that we see most frequently in feline patients. Most cases of lip entrapment occur following the extraction of a maxillary canine tooth.  

Cats have relatively tight upper lips compared to our canine patients. The presence of the maxillary canine tooth aids in holding the lip out to a sufficient degree that when the mouth closes the mandibular canine tooth slips inside the upper lip without causing trauma. Loss of the maxillary canine tooth can allow the upper lip to drop inwards. For some cats this results in the lower canine contacting, trapping and traumatising the upper lip.  

Crown Amputation

Has crown amputation been mentioned to you when discussing extraction of your pet’s teeth? Crown amputation with intentional root retention is a procedure that may be appropriate in select circumstances when performing dental treatment on your pet.